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Push Click MLM Compensation Plan Review

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Introduction to Push Click MLM Compensation Plan

Welcome back to Notebook Crazy, the grouchiest multilevel marketing (MLM) blog in the Midwest. I am Brad, and the introduction to this Push Click Commissions review may actually serve to help this blog of mine live down its reputation as the grouchiest of grouch MLM blogs.  It is almost a cliché for bloggers to go on and on about things that get on their nerves, but something I saw on the Push Click Commissions website while I was researching this Push Click Commissions review got me thinking about something that doesn’t bother me all that much.

If you have read my other MLM reviews on this site, you know that it doesn’t take much to make me mad.  You have read about a lot of things that bring out my inner grouch.  For example, you know that among the things that make me go from zero to “Pete Townshend responding to a yes/no question in a televised interview” level of grouchy eloquence in a matter of seconds include nutritional supplements and the exaggerated claims attached to them, fungi, doing anything in the winter except sitting on my keister, and the marketing of expensive travel packages in a time and place where almost no one can afford to take a road trip to the next state unless it involves couch surfing or an RV.  There are a lot of things that get my goat, especially in the world of MLM.  I hate articles and blog posts that are all hype and no information or anecdotes.  It gets my goat when people don’t fact check.  (My blood pressure is rising now just thinking about the number of reviews of that documentary about Kit Lambert and Chris Stamp’s relationship with The Who where the reviewers did not even bother to do a quick Google search to find out that Pete Townshend’s last name has an H, but John Entwistle’s last name doesn’t.) It makes my blood boil when people try to deprive me of my beloved junk food.  I am outraged at MLMs that try to get people to sell products (like multivitamins) and services (like electricity and Internet) that they could get much cheaper if they did a few clicks’ worth of research, and probably are getting much cheaper.  I despise the cult of personality that grows up around some MLM leaders.  It vexes me to read web content that sounds like it was written for search engine optimization (SEO) purposes only, although well-written SEO content can be one of life’s pleasures.  I dislike fruit when it is served to me to improve my health, although I quite like it when it is on the table simply because it tastes good.  Grouchy as I may be, I loathe mean-spirited blogs, especially when they are slanderous.  I don’t care for endlessly complex MLM plans that make you jump through lots of hoops for a net income of what amounts to less than minimum wage.  I’m not wild about business tools MLMs that sell you expensive versions of free software.  I’m not a big fan of MLM training materials.  And don’t get me started on MLM home sales parties.

Given that I have such strong opinions, especially about subjects related to online writing, it may surprise you that, despite all the things on the Internet that tick me off, typos don’t bother me that much.  I have been a blogger for long enough (much longer than the word “blog” has existed, but that is a story for another day) to know that typos are inevitable.  The fact that I only use one of my fingers for typing probably means that I am even less immune to landing on the wrong key than most of the rest of the blogosphere.  In fact, it would not surprise me at all if I have already made at least one typo in the introduction to this Push Click Commissions review.

The late, great Midwesterner Roger Ebert once wrote in his blog that one of the things about Chaz Hammelsmith (to whom he was married from 1992 until his death in 2013) that captured his heart when they first met was that her emails never contained typos.  She cared enough to proofread.  While I admire both of their commitment to good writing, I can let quite a few typos slide before I start to consider something less than well-written.  This lenient attitude toward typos runs in my family.  My brother Brian is an English teacher, and if he let typos and misspellings, he would not have lasted nearly

as long as he has in his profession.  It doesn’t even bother him when people mis-type his name as “Brain,” even though there are plenty of guys named Brian in the world for whom that is their number one pet peeve.

Most typos don’t bother me, but there was one I saw on a screenshot of the Push Click Commissions website in a Push Click Commissions review that I simply cannot let slide.

Push Click Commissions: The Company and Its Products

Image result for pushclick mlm

The Push Click Commissions business opportunity is an online marketing training course.  At least I think it is.  It is some type of online business training course.  The reason I do not have more details about the Push Click Commissions business opportunity than I do is that, according to the Push Click Commissions website, the company is still in pre-launch and will launch in December.

The Push Click Commissions website does contain a considerable amount of information about the founders of the Push Click Commissions business opportunity and about the Push Click Commissions products.  The founders of the Push Click Commissions business opportunity are Billy Darr, VenkataRamana, and Sandy Nayak.  The site describes several Push Click Commissions products, which are training materials and online business tools.  One of the products described on the Push Click Commissions website is Front End, which is a training video which, according to the training video, will show you “how to make $50 to $200 per day” online, even if you do not have a website or any previous experience with online businesses.  Another is 0 to 1, which, according to the Push Click Commissions website, is a set of templates “that are designer to convert as high as 30%” (I am confused by that sentence, too), and a third product is 0 to 2, a 4-week series of webinars in which Billy Darr shows Push Click Commissions members “exactly how he makes $10K and beyond every month.”

The Push Click Commissions website does not say how much it costs to join the Push Click Commissions business opportunity, but it does have a place to click to request your affiliate link.  I hope that means it is free.  There is a lot of language on the Push Click Commissions website encouraging prospective shows Push Click Commissions members to promote the Push Click Commissions business opportunity, which could be something as harmless as straight up affiliate marketing (in one place the Push Click Commissions website says “promote us and we will promote you”) or as sleazy as selling an opportunity.

So what is the egregious typo?  Well, it looks like it has been corrected on the Push Click Commissions website, but while I was reading Push Click Commissions reviews to find out other bloggers’ opinions about the Push Click Commissions business opportunity, I found one Push Click Commissions review that had some screen shots from an old version of the Push Click Commissions website where it described the various bonuses of the Push Click Commissions compensation plan.  All of the screen shots spelled “bonus” as “bonsu” in big letters.  To give you an idea of how obvious of a mistake that is, when I typed “bonsu” just now, and in the previous sentence, my spell check autocorrected it.  It isn’t that bonsu is an outrageously offensive word; I don’t think it means anything at all.  It’s just that it was there so many times and so big that it really made the site look unprofessional.  Even I, who type with a lone clumsy finger, would catch something like that.  I guess that is why they finally corrected it.

The Push Click Commissions Compensation Plan

The Push Click Commissions website does not contain a link to a Push Click Commissions compensation plan document, but there are some details about the Push Click Commissions compensation plan on the

main page of the Push Click Commissions website.  There is an image describing the sales funnel, which raises more questions than it answers.  It says that you get a 100% commission on the Front End product and a 50% commission on the sale of the other Push Click Commissions products.  Instead of bonuses (O bonsu, where art thou?) and bonus pools, the Push Click Commissions compensation plan mentions various contests and prizes.  In that regard, it reminded me a little bit of Receipt Hog, a company I reviewed on this site this summer, on which the games sounded like fun.  (Memorably, one Receipt Hog member said that her young children enjoyed playing the Receipt Hog slot machine.)  One of the contests in the Push Click Commissions compensation plan is a “most sales contest,” which doesn’t sound like nearly as much fun as a slot machine, but at least it does not seem to be taking place at an MLM pep rally in the convention room of a chain hotel.  Those events aren’t fun at all.  (The one exception is that it was at such an event that I met my buddy Drew, who has almost as many pet reptiles as he does boxes of unsold MLM merchandise in his house, but that is a story for another day.)

Advantages and Disadvantages

Advantages

  • Push Click Commissions products are not nutraceuticals and, as such, do not contain fungus.
  • Bonsu would be quite a catchy name for an Internet troll.

Disadvantages

  • The Push Click Commissions website invites people to join the Push Click Commissions business opportunity even before its official launch. I understand that it is important for companies to start spreading the word about their existence and their products before they officially open for business, but the whole thing where business tools MLMs (Push Click Commissions is far from the only business tools company to do this) invites people to join before the company even launches seems a little bit shady to me.  It sounds too close for comfort to asking people to invest in Bradonium before any Bradonium has actually been discovered.  For more information on the perils of investing in things that may or may not exist, see my OneCoin review on this site.
  • I never said Notebook Crazy was a completely awesome name for a blog, but Push Click Commissions is not the most businesslike name for a business. It sounds like it is appealing to people’s desire to get rich quick rather than to learn sound business skills.
  • For that matter, the slogan “copy and paste your way to $80/day” sounds like business tools hype.
  • When you hear the words “100% commission” in an MLM compensation plan, you should take that as a signal to run in the opposite direction.

Conclusion

It appears that the Push Click Commissions business opportunity is more about business training materials and less about recruiting, which is a good thing.  That said, I have reviewed lots of business training courses recently (some of them more MLM-like than others), and none of them seem particularly compelling.  It is possible to benefit from an online business training course; the other Brad and I took one about two years ago, and it contributed greatly to our success in business.  Push Click

Commissions products may actually teach you something you don’t know about online marketing, but I have a feeling you will have to do a little bit more than just copy and paste to have a successful business.

Are you sure you don’t want to invest in Bradonium?  There is still time.  Schedule a call with me so you can get in on the action before the Bradonium bubble bursts.

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